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Polarization Issues?

Posted by: Hill and Dale Photography on 01/30/2013 - 1:53 PM

I took this shot this morning during some heavy fog.

I noticed the round rings... you can see them all over the image. So how does one keep that from happening?

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Most Recent Reply

Posted by: Paul Cowan on 01/31/2013 - 4:59 AM

An image like that has a very narrow exposure range, just a couple of sharp peaks on a histogram, I would think. If you have tried to spread out the exposure to fill the histogram (i.e moving in the left and right sliders) then you would be stretching the tones out, which could do nasty things to them. It does appear under-exposed, which suggests that at the very least the exposure was pushed up a stop or so in processing the RAW version, which would also tend to create problems.

 

Posted by: Amy Weiss on 01/31/2013 - 3:10 AM

It looks as if the photo was really underexposed, which can also cause the banding. When shooting in fog, you should overexpose a bit...

http://fotoflock.com/learn-photography/photography-basics/34-basics-of-photography/5533-fog-photography-the-basics

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Campbell on 01/30/2013 - 11:16 PM

Since the problem is occurring in the fog, I would use the blur tool in Photoshop to see if the remainder can be removed.

 

Posted by: Christine Till on 01/30/2013 - 10:26 PM


it's looking much better now.

 

Posted by: Rich Franco on 01/30/2013 - 10:11 PM

HD,

This little exercise you just went through really demonstrates the power of the RAW file and why it's the only way to shoot. I hope more people see this and realize that this is the way to capture images.

What was your ISO and what was your camera/lens used?

This new "version" is so much better!!!

Rich

 

Posted by: Hill and Dale Photography on 01/30/2013 - 8:45 PM

Using then RAW file really helped the image. However even then when I went to adjust the image in the brightness settings I ran into the "moire" or banding, however much less noticeable. Maybe the fog had something to do with it, as it was quite heavy this morning. I added a texture overlay to try to help cover the very, very slight banding that occurred when I decided to go ahead and adjust the brightness anyway... and I kind of like it now actually!

Lynn yes the raw file was huge!

Thanks for all your feedback!

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Posted by: Lynn Palmer on 01/30/2013 - 6:42 PM

725x482 px is a very, very small image. I'm not suprised to see banding in the sky at such a low resolution. Do you have a larger jpg?

 

Posted by: Rich Franco on 01/30/2013 - 3:50 PM

HD,

If you have the RAW file, this should clear it up. Let us know how it turns out,

Rich

 

Posted by: Jeffrey Campbell on 01/30/2013 - 2:33 PM

The gradient(s) are often referred to as "moire", and I recall a You Tube video on how to fix things. I do not remember if the video was specifically addressing Photoshop gradients, or those in pictures.

It's worth the try, though.

 

Posted by: Mike Savad on 01/30/2013 - 2:23 PM

rings have to do with how your saving it. it's like it was saved for web and it was simplied in the sky. usually you'll see banding on a cheap lcd screen. but they've come a long way since then. so i'm sticking with saving and compressing issues. i'm seeing a bit of colored noise in there too.

---Mike Savad

 

Posted by: Christine Till on 01/30/2013 - 2:20 PM


That's good news :-)

 

Posted by: Hill and Dale Photography on 01/30/2013 - 2:19 PM

Rich no polarizer or filters. And it is on the original JPG too. No amount of manipulation cleared it up unfortunately.

Christine thanks. I do have a RAW file also, thank God! Im going to go have a look at how that came out....

 

Posted by: Christine Till on 01/30/2013 - 2:08 PM


What you refer to is circular color banding. It's usually added by the camera to hide sudden transitions.
It also happens in Photoshop-Gradients.

If what you posted above is your original shot, then let me guess: Your shot is a jpg. In your case shooting RAW to prevent that the camera manipulates the image would have been the way to go.
There's not much if anything you can do to "rescue" this shot if this is the original jpg.

 

Posted by: Rich Franco on 01/30/2013 - 2:05 PM

HD,

were you using a polarizer? Was there something on the end of the lens? Did the circles show up after editing and not in the original? If this is brightened, do the rings go away?

Rich

 

This discussion is closed.