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Alfred Ng

2 Years Ago

Name That Flower!

I want to start this tread as to way to help other to learn the name of some uncommon flowers. Often in my travel, I came across plants or trees I haven’t seen before. Maybe with this we all can learn something. Do feel free to add your knowledge with us!

My first one is the city flower of Hong Kong” Bauhinia or also called “Chinese orchid tree”
This plant is thought to be an accidental hybrid between B. purpurea and B. variegata. It was discovered on the seashore of Hong Kong Island in Pok Fu Lam, near the ruins of a house in 1880 by Sir Henry Blake, a British Governor of Hong Kong from 1898 to 1903 and an enthusiastic botanist.
The genus name Bauhinia was given after the 16th century Herbalists Jan and Caspar Bauhin. After the handing back of Hong Kong to China, a special award was created to replace the British Imperial honors. The award is called the Grand Bauhinia Medal, or GBM for short.
The flower of Bauhinia was adopted by the Urban Council as the floral emblem of Hong Kong in 1965 and since 1997 has been part of the flag of Hong Kong and has become the floral emblem for the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, and appears on its coins.
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Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Does any one know the flower I took? Thank you!

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Warren Thompson

2 Years Ago

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Al...I got this orchid in Lakeland Florida.

 

Rebecca Sherman

2 Years Ago

Xueling, Maybe Alfred can narrow it down, but I think it might be something in the grevillea family.

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Thank you Rebecca,
I will search it for sure! Have a nice weekend:-)!

 

Alfred Ng

2 Years Ago

Xueling,
I haven't seen this one before, there are many flowers out west and we don't have here. looks like the Monarda and it does looks like from the succulents. How big is the plant?

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Thank you, Alfred! The one I posted above is about a shrub size, about 4 feet tall.

I have another unknown tree, please help:

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Alfred Ng

2 Years Ago

Very unusual blooms Xueling but I haven't seen this one before. Does it produce fruites? maybe someone else can name this one?

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Thank you, Alfred! Maybe it doesn't have fruits, but I really have no idea! I have a lot plant photos I don't know the names. I hope someone will help!!

 

Alfred Ng

2 Years Ago

Xueling, I also with flickr ( www.flickr.com ) and belong to a group called " what plant is this?". if you post your photo to that group many can help you with the name.

 

Alfred Ng

2 Years Ago

I saw this flower at the Golden Gate Park in San Francisco. It looks a lot like a poppy. It is called “gum rockrose/ Cistus ladanifer. It is a native of the western Mediterranean region. It is indigenous to Spain, Portugal and north-west Africa.

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Deborah Smolinske

2 Years Ago

I think Xueling's first flower is a pixie bush

http://www.oznativeplants.com/plantdetail/Pixie-Bush/Eremophila/oldfieldii/ssp-oldfieldii.html

And the second one looks like very early lilac blossoms that haven't opened yet.

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Hi Deborah,

Thank you so much for your link and your response! They may belong to the same family.

The 2nd one was a very tall tree, I think it was much bigger than the lilac.

 

Deborah Smolinske

2 Years Ago

Lilac trees can grow as tall as 30 feet, Xueling.

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Yes, you are right, but the leaves looked very different. Very green and thicker, heart shaped, and the stems were red color and very strong . The flowers were blooming and looked like little berries, they were not buds. Just liked the way they were, some of them fell off the tree, didn't have any strong scent. The tree looked somewhat like a birch tree.

 

SAIGON De Manila

2 Years Ago

this is common but I simply dunno what flower is this...

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Rebecca Sherman

2 Years Ago

@Saigon: That is Hymenocallis liriosme/Spider Lily.

http://www.onlineplantguide.com/PlantDetails.aspx?Plant_id=1166

 

SAIGON De Manila

2 Years Ago

Thank you Rebecca...now I know what's my new poetry or prose will be themed on this subjective piece of art.

-Saigon

 

Deborah Smolinske

2 Years Ago

Xueling, what you describe could still be a lilac tree. Some have heart-shaped leaves, birch-like bark, red stems, and little to no scent. However, what you describe could also be a redbud tree. Google "redbud tree" and see if the images look anything like what you saw.

 

Alfred Ng

2 Years Ago

I don't think it is a red bud or lilac, those looks like seeding to me. the flower of the red bud tree come out before the leaves. here is my photo of it.

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Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Hi Deborah, Thanks for your great help! Maybe it was a different type of lilac, but not the red bud tree. Thank you:-)!

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Does anyone know this plant? Thank you:-)!!

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Deborah Smolinske

2 Years Ago

Looks like a Blue Lupin to me, Xueling.

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Sorry Deborah, they are not Blue Lupin. This is more tropical plant with big leaves, which looked like the Calla lily's leaves

 

Alfred Ng

2 Years Ago

Xueling, it looks like a Bromeliad.

 

Xueling Zou

2 Years Ago

Thank you so much Alfred!! Amazing eye you have! I think you are right:-)! I've found the link after I searched "Bromeliad", http://www.flickriver.com/photos/jungle_mama/5209488020/

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Sharon Mau

5 Months Ago

. . looks like
crane red ornamental kale
Brassica oleracea



. . ♥ . .

 

Vivian ANDERSON

5 Months Ago

Thanks so much, Sharon.......indeed it is........Wishing you well this day, Cheers, Vivian

 

Daniel Crihfield

5 Months Ago


 

Craig Carter

3 Months Ago

Does anyone know this flower? I would appreciate it very much for any help you may provide.

garden view by craig carter

 

Jean Noren

3 Months Ago

That looks like a blanket flower, Gaillardia

 

Carolyn Marshall

3 Months Ago

Craig, it's called a Blanket Flower, and is in the sunflower family. Here's the Wiki link for info. You can research it further from there.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaillardia

 

Dan Richards

3 Months Ago

I believe that is a Black-eyed Susan.

 

Craig Carter

3 Months Ago

Thanks Jean,Carolyn and Dan! I appreciate it very much.

 

Heather Applegate

3 Months Ago

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stalk is similar to a chive... quite large (there's a bee on it for scale)... photographed in a city rooftop garden in London.
No idea what it is.

 

Jim Vansant

3 Months Ago

looks like an ornamental onion, I've grown some of these but depends where you buy them for the common name.

 
 

Heather Applegate

3 Months Ago

Gonna run with allium... thanks!

 
 

JD Grimes

1 Month Ago

@Phyllis — That is Sandbog Death-camas (Zigadenus glaberrimus). Death-camases are poisonous, so don't eat it! :-)

 

Phyllis Beiser

1 Month Ago

Thanks JD. I will be sure not to eat them.! LOL I will have to watch my grand daughter around them because she loves to pick wildflowers for me.

 

Mario Carta

1 Month Ago

Alfred, I have seen that flower before, I believe the common name is Poor Mans orchid, the botanical name I'm not sure but a quick google search might reveal it. I have picked these flowers of a very large tree it has a bark type twig as a stem and they do hold up a few days if cut properly.

oh, sorry Alfred, I should have read your complete op, I thought you were asking for the name of your flower.

 

Alfred Ng

1 Month Ago

No problems Mario, this thread is to help other with ID flowers and plants. I learn a lot of names of flowers I haven't seen before.

 

Mario Carta

1 Month Ago

Having been in the flower business and landscape business years ago, I can certainly appreciate that, I cringe at all the names of flowers and plants I was expected to know, I have since purged my brain of all such names of flowers and plants and think that the people that give the botanical names to plants do more with there plants than just name them.Lol

 

Bellesouth Studio

1 Month Ago

I'm hoping that someone recognizes this. It grows wild on our property, and I have looked in both of my wildflower books, and did an image search on Google. Nada. I realize it's not a striking flower and am not planning on trying to sell the photo, but I'd still love to know what it's called!

thanks, Rebecca

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Sharon Mau

1 Month Ago



. . Aloha Rebecca . first I visited your portfolio to see where in the world you live . . South Carolina . . .
Next I conducted a google search using

Keywords:

south carolina • wildflowers • round • white flower • five petals • red stem • long stem • basal leaves . .

. . and found it :))

Parthenium integrifolium

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parthenium_integrifolium
Wikipedia:
Parthenium integrifolium is a species of flowering plant in the aster family known by the common names wild quinine, American feverfew, and eastern feverfew. It is native to the eastern United States. This plant is a perennial herb growing 30 to 60 centimeters tall, but known to exceed one meter at times. The glandular leaves are oval to lance-shaped and variable in size. They have serrated, toothed, or lobed edges. The inflorescence is an array of several flower heads containing whitish disc flowers and 5 to 6 ray flowers. The "flowers have a pleasant but mild medicinal fragrance. This plant grows in disturbed areas as well as prairies, woods, and hillsides. It tolerates hot and cold climates and can be used as a garden plant in many areas. The leaves of the plant contain tannins and the plant was used for medicinal and veterinary purposes by Native Americans.


Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Genus: Parthenium
Species: P. integrifolium
Binomial name
Parthenium integrifolium

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Parthenium integrifolium - Flora of North America
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5. Parthenium integrifolium Linnaeus, Sp. Pl. 2: 988. 1753.
Parthenium auriculatum Britton; P. hispidum Rafinesque; P. hispidum var. auriculatum (Britton) Rollins; P. integrifolium var. auriculatum (Britton) Cornelius ex Cronquist; P. integrifolium var. henryanum Mears; P. integrifolium var. hispidum (Rafinesque) Mears; P. integrifolium var. mabryanum Mears; P. radfordii Mears
Perennials, 30–60(–100+) cm. Leaf blades ovate to lanceolate, 30–350+ × 20–120+ mm, margins usually crenate to serrate, sometimes coarsely toothed or somewhat lobed (then mostly toward bases), faces hispid to hirtellous or ± scabrous, gland-dotted. Heads radiate, borne in corymbiform to paniculiform arrays. Peduncles 1–8(–12+) mm. Phyllaries: outer 5(–6) lanceolate to broadly ovate, 3–5 mm, inner 5(–6) ± orbiculate, 4–6 mm. Pistillate florets 5(–6); corolla laminae ovate to oblong or orbiculate, 1–2+ mm. Disc florets 15–35+. Cypselae ± obovoid, 3–4+ mm; pappus-like enations 0 or 2(–4), erect to spreading, ± subulate or threadlike, fragile, 0.3–0.6+ mm. 2n = 72.
Flowering May–Sep. Glades and barrens, prairies, disturbed sites; 10–500 m; Ala., Ark., Conn., Ga., Ill., Ind., Iowa., Kans., Ky., La., Mass., Mich., Minn., Miss., Mo., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Okla., Pa., S.C., Tenn., Tex., Va., W.Va., Wis.
http://www.efloras.org/florataxon.aspx?flora_id=1&taxon_id=242416946

 

Bellesouth Studio

1 Month Ago

Sharon, how amazing! I apologize for not including my state in the post. I went back to my (thick) books and still can't find it! I would not have thought it was in the aster family. Wish it were more photogenic, but I don't think many people would be drawn to it.

Thanks again so much!!

Rebecca

 

Sharon Mau

1 Month Ago



. . ★ . . :: happy to help . . you're welcome Rebecca :: . . ★ . .

 

Frederick Smith

1 Month Ago

I lost my notes and have no idea what this flower is? Anyone know?

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Alfred Ng

1 Month Ago

Cleome hassleriana, commonly known as spider flower or spider plant.

 

Richard Cummings

1 Month Ago

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Greetings to everyone. I found this flower group today but have no idea what it is called. Could anyone help?
Thank you in advance.

Richard

 

JD Grimes

1 Month Ago

Richard, that is some kind of sage (Salvia).

 

Richard Cummings

1 Month Ago

Thank you very much, JD. I found the exact name: Hummingbird Sage, Texas Sage, Scarlet Sage 'Coral Nymph' (Salvia coccinea)

 

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